Language as an Emergent Function: Some Radical Neurological and Evolutionary Implications

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Published 06-09-2005
Terrence W. DEACON

Abstract

Language is a spontaneously evolved emergent adaptation, not a formal computational system. Its structure does not derive from either innate or social instruction but rather self-organization and selection. Its quasi-universal features emerge from the interactions among semiotic constraints, neural processing limitations, and social transmission dynamics.

How to Cite

DEACON, T. W. (2005). Language as an Emergent Function: Some Radical Neurological and Evolutionary Implications. THEORIA, 20(3), 269–286. https://doi.org/10.1387/theoria.562
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Keywords

coevolution, emergence, self-organization, semiotics, differentiation, neural development.

Section
MONOGRAPHIC SECTION